Poem: “Sympathy,” by Paul Laurence Dunbar

Poem: “Sympathy,” by Paul Laurence Dunbar

I know what the caged bird feels, alas! When the sun is bright on the upland slopes; When the wind stirs soft through the springing grass, And the river flows like a stream of glass; When the first bird sings and the first bud opes, And the faint perfume from its...
Poem: “Lincoln,” by Carl Sandburg

Poem: “Lincoln,” by Carl Sandburg

Lincoln? He was a mystery in smoke and flags Saying yes to the smoke, yes to the flags, Yes to the paradoxes of democracy, Yes to the hopes of government Of the people by the people for the people, No to debauchery of the public mind, No to personal malice nursed and...
Poem: The Calf-Path

Poem: The Calf-Path

Sometimes taking the path of compassion means abandoning the well-traveled path, as this 1895 poem by Sam Walter Foss reminds us: One day through the primeval wood A calf walked home, as good calves should; But made a trail all bent askew, A crooked trail as all...
Poem: “Mysteries, Yes,” by Mary Oliver

Poem: “Mysteries, Yes,” by Mary Oliver

Truly, we live with mysteries too marvelous to be understood. How grass can be nourishing in the mouths of the lambs. How rivers and stones are forever in allegiance with gravity while we ourselves dream of rising. How two hands touch and the bonds will never be...
Poem: “The Orange,” by Wendy Cope

Poem: “The Orange,” by Wendy Cope

At lunchtime I bought a huge orange— The size of it made us all laugh. I peeled it and shared it with Robert and Dave— They got quarters and I got a half. And that orange, it made me so happy, As ordinary things often do Just lately. The shopping. A walk in the park....
Poem: “The Shoelace,” by Charles Bukowski

Poem: “The Shoelace,” by Charles Bukowski

a woman, a tire that’s flat, a disease, a desire: fears in front of you, fears that hold so still you can study them like pieces on a chessboard… it’s not the large things that send a man to the madhouse. death he’s ready for, or murder, incest, robbery, fire, flood…...